Milton’s Hidden Seashore Open Morning

The sun was out for our open morning at Milton Locks Nature Reserve on Saturday. We saw over 60 people including a walking team from 72nd Portsmouth Scouts who stopped in on their way past. We also had the pleasure of meeting the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress of Portsmouth, who got fully involved in the activities and chatted to the project team and visiting families.

All in all, it was a successful morning and we spotted a slow worm, a red admiral butterfly and a peacock butterfly amongst other delights. We were also visited by a flock of redshank, who disappeared every time someone tried to point binoculars at them. Here are some snaps I took on the morning.

Sunny scenes from the beginning of morning at the reserve.

Open Day Lord Mayor JDM

The Lord Mayor and the Lady Mayoress were definitely the most elegantly dressed of our visitors on Saturday. I felt even more scruffy than usual by comparison.

Sightings and peaceful moments from Carole and Martin

Portsmouth this morning is a mysteriously grey and foggy place. Fog horn sounds are drifting in from the harbours and the Solent, like eerie music. Yesterday, however, was a sparkling spring day. Martin sent in some words and photos that I would like to share with you all.

‘Carole and I had a lovely walk around Milton Lock in the sunshine this morning.  Here are a few photos I took. The blackbirds were at the entrance to the reserve, right next to our car. There were lots of noisy starlings in the bushes but I couldn’t get a decent picture. The redshanks were towards the top end of the lake, there were about 40 of them in the flock stood there waiting for the tide to go out, I notice that several of them are ringed. After our walk round the reserve we went and sat by the sea lock in the sunshine for a coffee and watched a seal catching fish in the harbour, brilliant.’

Blackheaded gull Martin Roberts

A Black-headed Gull

 

Blackbird 1 Martin Roberts

Female blackbird by the car park

Redshank flock Martin Roberts

Redshank waiting for the tide

Thank you for the photos Martin. They’ve made me realise I must make time to visit Milton’s hidden seashore when I’m not in a rush and I can just pause and absorb the sights and sounds.

More sightings from Carole and Martin

Volunteers Carole and Martin braved the gales yesterday to visit Milton Locks nature reserve and they have sent me some more lovely photos. The wildlife didn’t seem to mind Storm Doris and they spotted and snapped a handsome mute swan, a turnstone and a redshank .mute-swan-by-martin-roberts

The turnstone (below) is beautifully camouflaged. Looks for the orange legs and you will spot it.

turnstone-by-martin-robertsThe redshank uses its long bill to find food in the rich Langstone Harbour mud.

redshank-by-martin-roberts

I’m off to Milton Locks later today for an outdoor learning session and I’m hoping to find the mysterious ‘Milton Monster’. I’ll report any discoveries.